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What’s New

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is currently presenting “Beloved Women of Chota: War Women of the Cherokee” on the Charlton State through Nov. 2.

Produced by the American Indian Initiative at Colonial Williamsburg, the production commemorates the Cherokee peoples’ ties to Virginia in the 18th century.

“‘The Beloved Women of Chota’ is a significant addition to Colonial …

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By Karen Gonzalez

Feeling autumnal? Here are five great fall things to do in the Historic Area over the next five weeks.

 

More Bricks for Our Walls

Love big fires on cool nights? Then the Firing The Brick Kiln at the Brickyard is for you.

From Nov. 19-23 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., brickmakers will be …

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The Frenchman’s Map (1782).

Whether one is looking for treasure or the closest Starbucks, most searches are more productive with a map. Colonial Williamsburg’s archaeologists are the first to admit this, which is why each of our excavations begins by consulting the Frenchman’s Map.

The Frenchman’s Map is a Revolutionary War-period map of Williamsburg. Hand-drawn …

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It is in the middle of October that we plant our garlic and shallots which is true for most all of the North American colonies.

German Red Garlic bulb

Garlic has a long usage as a medicinal plant but was seldom used in America as a culinary spice until relatively recently.

As late as 1851 Peter …

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By Ben Swenson

Could you name three types of oak tree if you had to? How about five? Laura Viancour can. She’s Colonial Williamsburg’s Manager of Landscape Services, part of a devoted team that shoulders a tall responsibility: maintaining the Historic Area’s oaks — all 13 species of them — and much more.

There are over …

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This week on the podcast, we reach into the grave for some buried history. In the spirit of All Hallows, we unearth the unexpected truth about colonial burial garments. Research Librarian Juliegh Clark tells us nearly all colonists would have been buried in a shroud — never their best clothes.

Listen now.


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