Colonial Williamsburg®

What's New on History.org: The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Official History and Citizenship Website

What’s New

By John Watson

Each hole on the toe boards will have a pipe perched on it.

A toe board looks like a solid board with slightly funnel-shaped holes for the pipes (see wind-chest diagram), but the boards are anything but solid. Inside the toe board are many hidden channels running … Continue Reading »

Last week I had the great pleasure of accompanying a group of enthusiasts who study the genus Rhododendron.

View from Round Bald

On one of our treks we explored the balds of Roan Mountain that rise above 5,000 feet on the border of Tennessee and North Carolina and support a great population of Flame Azaleas … Continue Reading »

By Ben Swenson

The recruits of the Colonial Williamsburg Fifes and Drums have come to the Revolutionary City from many different backgrounds. Some always knew they’d join this ensemble. Others seemed to have stumbled on it accidentally.

All of them have signed on to a life-changing journey.

In these audio clips, the recruits tell the stories of what … Continue Reading »

By Ben Swenson

Entrepreneurs love to see business coming through the door. But when your line of work is an 18th-century Historic Trade, walk-ins are a rarity.

Yet that’s what happened last year at the Colonial Williamsburg Wheelwright and Carriage Shop. Matthew Mees and his wife were visiting the Revolutionary City and made a point to drop … Continue Reading »

This week on the podcast, hear renowned Thomas Jefferson interpreter Bill Barker read the Declaration of Independence. There’s no better way to celebrate Independence Day than with reverence for the words that started it all.

Listen now.

Zoom in on the Declaration of Independence.

By Karen Gonzalez

Peter Pelham’s musical influence found a way into the life of a Founding Father, according to new research.

A manuscript – or copybook – of music bearing the handwriting of Thomas Jefferson’s wife, Martha Wayles Jefferson, and Pelham, the 18th-century Bruton Parish Church organist and music teacher, offers a glimpse into the relationship between … Continue Reading »